Playing a Vital Role in the Preservation of the Gooding House

A veteran director and media strategist, Rex Elsass leads The Strategy Group for Media, a Delaware, Ohio, Republican advertising firm. In 2006, Rex Elsass gained recognition in the local community for the purchase and renovation of the historic Gooding House, which he turned into the company’s headquarters.

The Gooding family sold the property in 2001, and community members became active in their attempts to save the historic property, which was scheduled for demolition. An independent contractor ultimately bought the building and worked with a historic preservation consultant to discuss options for returning the property to a usable state. Rex Elsass purchased the Gooding House a year after it appeared on the National Register of Historic Places. He then engaged a contractor to restore the property. Key upgrades include the addition of a guest suite for the firm’s guests and the addition of furnishings that fit the era of the house.

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Hope for Hilltribes Supports Families Affected by HIV/AIDS

As the founder and chief executive officer of Strategy Group for Media, Rex Elsass has helped a number of high-profile candidates run successful political campaigns. In his free time, Rex Elsass contributes his time and resources to several charities and nonprofits, including Hope for Hilltribes.

Hope for Hilltribes is a Columbus, Ohio-based nonprofit organization that seeks to improve the lives of ethnic minorities living in Thailand, as well those who have moved to the United States through programs and activities that provide much-needed medical, academic, and financial assistance. Currently, Hope for Hilltribes operates several important programs within Thailand, including its House of Love.

For the last 16 years, the House of Love has been providing shelter to women and children affected by HIV/AIDS. House of Love residents come from a range of backgrounds and include women who have been sold into prostitution, orphans of parents who have died of AIDS, and children removed from their homes due to abuse. Since it first opened its doors, House of Love has been home to approximately 100 women and children and today continues to meet the physical, medical, and emotional needs of the people it serves.